YORKSHIRE TERRIER

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GROOMING DEMAND RATING   –   MODERATELY HIGH

FULL GROOMING INTERVAL   –   4 TO 6 WEEKS

MAINTENANCE INTERVAL   –   WEEKLY

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FULL GROOMING  $50-55 Depending on size

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The Yorkshire Terrier is one of the most popular dogs, not only because of their very cute appearance, but also because of their unique and charming personalities.
While, in general, the Yorkie is a very happy and amusing companion, each dog does have their very own unique personalities. Each Yorkie will have their own little traits and quirks. Ranked #17 out of 90 in regard to intelligence, this breed can learn quite a bit if an owner invests the time.

Small in size but big in personality, the Yorkshire Terrier makes a feisty but loving companion. The most popular toy dog breed in the U.S., the “Yorkie” has won many fans with his devotion to his owners, his elegant looks, and his suitability to apartment living.

 

Yorkshire Terrier Temperament in General

The Yorkie is known for their:75_rose_lyserod_pink
  • Intelligence – Above average for canines- generally easy to house train when using proper methods
  • Courage75_rose_lyserod_pink
  • Independence
  • Energy – most are up for exercise or play time any time!

 

The Yorkshire Terrier, nicknamed the Yorkie, seems quite full of himself, and why not? With his long silky coat and perky topknot, the Yorkshire Terrier is one of the most glamorous representatives of the dog world, sure to attract attention wherever he goes.

Because he’s so small he often travels in style — in special dog purses toted around by his adoring owner. The long steel-blue and tan coat may be the Yorkie’s crowning glory, but it’s his personality that truly endears him to his family

THIS IS HOW PRICKLEY PEAR ENJOYS HIS SPA DAY

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Yorkshire Terriers are affectionate towards their people as one would expect from a companion dog, but true to their terrier heritage, they’re sometimes suspicious of strangers, and will bark at strange sounds and intruders. In consideration of your neighbors, it’s important to tone down their yappiness and teach them when and when not to bark.

They also can be aggressive toward strange dogs, and no squirrel is safe from them. Despite their bravado, Yorkshire Terriers have a soft side too. They need lots of attention and time with their family. Long hours of being left alone is not for them. It’s not a good idea to over-protect your Yorkie, however; they’ll pick up on your feelings very quickly, and if your actions say the world’s a dangerous place for them, they can become neurotic.

They can become snappish if they’re startled or teased. As long as they get some exercise every day — perhaps a good play session in the living room or a nice walk around the block — Yorkies make fine apartment dogs. No matter what home they live in, they’ll get along with other resident dogs and cats — so long as they were raised with them. Yorkies may become possessive of their owners if a new pet is brought into the house.

KEEPER

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History

During the Industrial Revolution in England, Scottish workers came to Yorkshire to work in the coal mines, textile mills, and factories, bringing with them a dog known as a Clydesdale Terrier or Paisley Terrier. These dogs were much larger than the Yorkshire Terrier we know today, and it’s thought that they were used primarily to catch rats in the mills. The Clydesdale Terriers were probably crossed with other types of terrier, perhaps the English Black and Tan Toy Terrier and the Skye Terrier.
The Waterside Terrier may also have contributed to the development of the Yorkshire Terrier. This was a small dog with a long blue-gray coat. In 1861, a Yorkshire Terrier was shown in a bench show as a “broken-haired Scotch Terrier.” A dog named Huddersfield Ben, born in 1865, became a popular show dog and is considered to be the father of the modern Yorkshire Terrier. The breed acquired that name in 1870 because that’s where most of its development had taken place. Yorkshire Terriers were first registered in the British Kennel Club stud book in 1874.
The first Yorkshire Terrier breed club in England was formed in 1898. The earliest record of a Yorkshire Terrier being born in the U.S. was in 1872. Yorkshire Terriers were able to compete in dog shows as early as 1878. In those early shows, Yorkshire Terriers classes were divided by weight — under 5 pounds and 5 pounds and over. Eventually, exhibitors settled on one class with an average of between 3 and 7 pounds.

 

Size

Yorkshire Terriers should be 8 to 9 inches at the shoulder and weigh no more than seven pounds, with four to six pounds being preferred. Yorkies are inconsistent in size. It’s not unusual for a single litter to contain one Yorkie weighing less than four pounds, one who weighs five or six pounds, and one who grows to be 12 to 15 pounds.
Beware of breeders who offer “tea cup” Yorkshire Terriers. Dogs who are smaller than the standard are prone to genetic disorders and are at a higher health risk in general.

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Health

Yorkies are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they’re prone to certain health conditions. If you’re buying a puppy, find a good breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy’s parents. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition. In Yorkies, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) for hip dysplasia (with a score of fair or better), elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand’s disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF) certifying that eyes are normal. You can confirm health clearances by checking the OFA web site (offa.org).

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